Last updated on April 5, 2024 by Stefano Ferro, founder of MEL365, following extensive travelling in Tuscany

10 days in Tuscany without a car or by car

You will be surprised at how much you can see and do in 10 days in Tuscany.

I mean, Tuscany is a big region, in fact, one of the biggest in Italy.

However, if you plan ahead, you’ll be able to see and do so much more.

Here’s where this guide can come in handy – whether you’re looking for a picturesque countryside, a romantic getaway, a family adventure, a trip filled with historical sites, or a unique experience.

Below is a list of five exciting itineraries for 10 days in Tuscany without a car or with a rented vehicle, at a relaxed pace or with more activities, or just for the most picturesque countryside

But let’s dig into it

10 days in Tuscany – in a nutshell

Here is a map showing all the towns and attractions featured in this guide.

Tuscany Map with attractions, towns, villages
Tuscany Map with attractions, towns, villages
  • 10 days in Tuscany without a car relaxed: with this itinerary, you will visit the top towns, villages, and attractions without having to drive. This is more of a relaxing getaway during which you stay in the same location for three or four nights while exploring the local area. Read more below on this itinerary
  • 10 days in Tuscany without a car on the go: Those who are prepared to travel more frequently and change accommodations more often will benefit from this itinerary. As a result, you’ll have to use more buses and trains but you’ll also experience a lot more. Read more below on this itinerary
  • 10 days in Tuscany by car relaxed: Your trip will be more flexible if you rent a vehicle. But it has some downsides (read on). You will be able to enjoy both the final destinations and the trip itself along the picturesque roads of Tuscany. Find out more about this itinerary below.
  • Tuscany by car on the go: This itinerary has a lot to offer. There will be more accommodation changes on this route, however, you’ll see and experience so much more as well. Read more below for the 10 days plan
  • Tuscany by car only for the countryside: With 10 days you will be able to experience so much of the Tuscan countryside. Beautiful places are everywhere. You can use this map to plan your trip to some of my favourite attractions and viewpoints in the countryside. Is there anything I can suggest? Always keep an eye out for beautiful corners, because they are everywhere.

Let me just mention a few points about the transportation within Tuscany and around it

Tuscany has two major airports:

  • Florence Airport, it takes 20 minutes by bus to get to the city centre
  • Pisa Airport (mostly low-cost airlines), 15 minutes to Pisa Centre and 1h15m to Florence Centre (Sky Bus or Autostradale Bus)

You can check out the public transportation within Tuscany here:

Trains and buses connect most towns in Tuscany, but if you wish to see the countryside, you will need a car. 

My go-to place for renting a car is DiscoverCars.com, a comparison site that can help you find the best rental rates (read cheapest).

10 days in Tuscany without a car relaxed

With this itinerary, you will be able to visit some of Tuscany’s most popular attractions, like the Uffizi Gallery in Florence and the Piazza del Campo in Siena.

10 days in Tuscany without a car relaxed
10 days in Tuscany without a car relaxed

In addition, you’ll have some time for a nice walk, a swim in the hotel pool or a leisurely stroll in the countryside.

  • Florence stay – Day 1: Start your trip in Florence by visiting the Uffizi Gallery, regarded as one of the world’s top art museums. The best way to save time, in this case, is to take the Priority Entrance Tour. Further, the tour guide will explain everything you need to know in a small group setting. Panini Toscani is the best place to enjoy lunch. Spend all afternoon exploring the Historical Centre on your own. Begin at the surprising Piazza Antinori, then walk to the Basilica of Holy Trinity before ending at the Piazza della Signoria. Following Borgo dei Greci Street, you will reach Piazza di Santa Croce. Lastly, proceed to Piazza del Duomo in the north of the Historical Centre.
  • Florence stay – Day 2: Keep going visiting Florence. In the morning, I recommend going to the Piazza Duomo and climbing the Dome via the Priority Entrance, bypassing the usual long queue. The included tour guide is essential for understanding the history of the dome and cathedral. Visit and cross the Ponte Vecchio, which is an arched Roman-medieval river bridge in Florence that you should not miss. The neighbourhood across the Arno is known as the Oltrarno. By turning right, you can walk up Borgo S. Jacopo Street to get to the St Trinity Bridge. Cross the bridge, back into the historical centre, and visit the Gothic Basilica of Holy Trinity. Afterwards, wander through the maze of small streets through Borgo Santi Apostoli.
  • Florence stay – Day 3: Time to start visiting the countryside with this well-organised Tour in the Chianti Area, a beautiful region with picturesque landscapes, rolling hills, and wineries to taste the world-famous wines
  • Florence stay – Day 4: Train to Pisa (1 hour) for a walking tour and indie sightseeing. Start your visit with the Leaning Tower and Cathedral. Purchasing a skip-the-line ticket is the best way to avoid the long lines at both popular attractions. Lunch is best at I Porci Comodi, a small bar with amazing sandwiches and cured meats from the area. Then, either take the Self-Guided Bike Tour or explore the historic centre beginning with the Museo della Grafica and the Piazza della Pera
  • Florence stay – Day 4 (alternative): enjoy a day of shopping at one of the best Designer Outlet in Italy, Barberino, take a Balloon Flight Over Tuscany or why not a romantic 6-Hour Vespa Tour (with traditional lunch).
  • Siena stay – Day 5: It’s time to move to Siena for the next four days. The train trip takes about 1 hour 45 minutes. After you have checked in to your hotel, go for a walk around the historic centre. The handmade pasta at Tigella Emilia is excellent for lunch. Then, stroll to Piazza del Campo, the Public Palace, and Duomo Cathedral (skip-the-line tickets are highly recommended here, too). Also nearby is the Baptistery of Saint John, another place to check out. For dinner, the Osteria Permalico is a charming restaurant inside a wine cellar.
  • Siena stay – Day 6: Enjoy a relaxing day out visiting Radda in Chianti and the Castle of Brolio on this organised tour. In addition, you’ll have the chance to visit some wineries and enjoy a delicious lunch with local ingredients.
  • Siena stay – Day 7: This is the day dedicated to the picturesque Val D’Orcia region. Public transportation is unfortunately not an option so you would need to join a tour. I highly recommend this Brunello di Montalcino Full-Day Wine Tour that drives through the rolling hills with 360-degree panoramic views. You will be able to taste different wines and you will learn all about the soils and the wine production process directly from the winemaker.
  • Siena stay – Day 8: Time for some chill-out time. Enjoy the town of Siena. You may want to consider doing a Cooking Class in the countryside or, if you are more adventurous, why not a Tour with a Vespa in the Tuscan Hills.
  • Arezzo stay – Day 9: Get ready to move to Arezzo, a lovely charming town. Bus #138 leaves around 8:30 am or 12:30 pm (check the Tiemme Bus website for the latest time schedule) or take the train (longer and less panoramic). Visit the historical centre after checking into your accommodation. Begin your exploration in Piazza Grande, the medieval square with the church Santa Maria della Pieve. Afterwards, have a tour in the Arezzo Cathedral. Lunch at the family-run restaurant Cio’ che Piace, which serves local food at a reasonable price. Explore Arezzo’s unassuming Pretorio Palace for its unique facade (be sure to check out the library inside), the Passeggio del Prato Park, and of course the Fortezza Medicea. You can also visit the nearby Roman Amphitheatre by walking to the end of the popular Corso Italia street. 
  • Arezzo stay – Day 10: Visit the wonderful city of Cortona on a day trip. From Arezzo Station, take the train (20 minutes) to Camuccia Cortona Station. Afterwards, you can take bus SU4 or SU5 to Piazza Mercato in Cortona. What makes Cortona so special…and popular? Clearly, because it appeared in the 2003 film “Under the Tuscan Sun”. That said, it is without a doubt one of the most striking villages in Tuscany. Walk a few meters north from Piazza Mercato (the bus end station) to enter the town through Porta Bifora (the town has many ancient gates leading into the centre). Continue up Via Ghibellina and you will find yourself in Piazza Repubblica.

Accommodations and experiences:

Read more options on where to stay in the Florence area.

10 days in Tuscany without a car on the go

In this itinerary I am going to stretch the itinerary with two more unique towns.

10 days in Tuscany without a car on the go
10 days in Tuscany without a car on the go

As usual, the trip starts from Florence.

  • Florence stay – Day 1: Similarly to the previous plan, start your day with the Uffizi Gallery (Priority Entrance Tour), lunch at Panini Toscani and explore the historical centre to finish your walk in Piazza del Duomo.
  • Florence stay – Day 2: Another day fully dedicated to this beautiful city with Piazza Duomo (Dome via the Priority Entrance), Ponte Vecchio, a walk through Oltrarno and back to the historical centre. You should also take some time to visit the splendid Forte di Belvedere (free entry), a 15th-century fortress with fantastic views of Florence and exhibits of artwork regularly on display.
  • Florence stay – Day 3: Discover the famed Tuscan countryside. Enjoy a Scenic Tour in the Chianti region, while stopping at some wineries for a taste of the local wines.
  • Pisa stay – Day 4: Start your exploration of Tuscany by taking a train (1 hour) to Pisa where you will see, of course, the famous Leaning Tower (skip-the-line ticket is a must), the Cathedral and the Historical Centre. Lunch at I Porci Comodi, a small bar offering fantastic sandwiches and lovely antipasti dishes. Sleep in Pisa
  • Pisa stay – Day 5: Take the train (30 minutes) for a day trip to Lucca, a Renaissance town with ancient walls that have been transformed into a pedestrian paradise. Start your excursion on Piazza Napoleone, where you can see the 15th-century Ducal Palace. Among the most popular sights to visit and see are: Tower Delle Ore, Guinigi Tower, Piazza dell’Anfiteatro, the boutique gallery Domus Romana and, of course, the walls.
  • Siena stay – Day 6: It’s time to move to Siena for the next two days. The train trip takes about 1 hour 45 minutes. After you have checked in to your hotel, go for a walk around the historic centre. The handmade pasta at Tigella Emilia is excellent for lunch. Then, stroll to Piazza del Campo, the Public Palace, and Duomo Cathedral (skip-the-line tickets are highly recommended here, too). Also nearby is the Baptistery of Saint John, another place to check out. The Osteria Permalico is a charming restaurant in a wine cellar that is great for dinner.
  • Siena stay – Day 7: This is the day dedicated to the picturesque Val D’Orcia region. A tour would be the best choice since public transportation is not a possible option (buses are rare and far between). I highly recommend this Brunello di Montalcino Full-Day Wine Tour that drives through the rolling hills with 360-degree panoramic views. In addition to tasting different wines, you will learn more about the soil and the wine production process from the winemaker.
  • Arezzo stay – Day 8: Get ready to move to Arezzo, a surprising medieval town with a charming atmosphere. You can take Bus #138 leaving around 8:30 am and 12:30 pm (check the Tiemme Bus website for the latest information) or take the train (longer and less panoramic). Check into your accommodation and visit the historical centre. Explore Piazza Grande, the medieval square with the church of Santa Maria della Pieve. Explore the Arezzo Cathedral afterwards. Have lunch at the local restaurant Cio’ che Piace, which serves reasonably priced local food. Get to know Arezzo’s Pretorio Palace with its unique facade (be sure to check out the library inside, too), the Passeggio del Prato Park, and of course the Fortezza Medicea. Alternatively, you can walk until the end of the central Corso Italia to see the Roman Amphitheatre
  • Arezzo stay – Day 9: Spend a day exploring the fantastic village of Cortona. Take the train to Camuccia Cortona Station (20 minutes) from Arezzo Station. From there take the local bus SU4 or SU5 to Piazza Mercato in Cortona. How has Cortona achieved such wide popularity? Surely because it was featured in the 2003 movie “Under the Tuscan Sun”. The village is, nevertheless, one of the most remarkable in Tuscany. From Piazza Mercato (the bus terminal), you can enter the town through Porta Bifora (there are many ancient gates leading into the centre of town). You will reach the central Piazza Repubblica if you continue up the Via Ghibellina.
  • Arezzo stay – Day 10: take the train (1 hour) for a day trip to Perugia. Technically we are here in Umbria, and not anymore in Tuscany. However, the town is absolutely gorgeous and unmissable. It’s also so well connected to Arezzo that it would be a pity to give it a miss.

Accommodations and experiences:

Ponte Vecchio, connecting Oltrarno to San Giovanni

Tuscany by car relaxed

You will be able to be more flexible if you rent a car.

In fact, one of the highlights of the holiday will be the trip through the Tuscan countryside, besides the destination.

Two tips for the car:

  • Is driving a car in Tuscany difficult? It is usually safe and easy to drive through the countryside. It can be however challenging to drive through the old centres due to their narrow streets. Major cities and towns such as Florence and Siena have the so-called ZTL area, which is the historical centre where cars are not allowed inside. This means you should park your car outside the historical centre and walk or take the bus inside the town. Read more on how ZTL works in Italy here, including a few maps.
  • No visible items should be left in your car, not even an empty bag, even in the countryside. Tuscany is not known for theft, but it may occur. You would really never want to have a broken window on your holiday, especially if it is for an empty bag. I have a full guide on renting a car in Tuscany, including scams and how to avoid them.

The website DiscoverCars.com, a great comparison tool that analyzes the prices of the major rental company, usually offers the best deals for cars. Moreover, you can add an inexpensive 7 Euro/day full insurance (no excess) for a no-worries experience.

10 days in Tuscany with a car relaxed
10 days in Tuscany with a car relaxed

Start your trip with two days in Florence, where you will not need a car

  • Florence stay – Day 1: Similar to the previous plans, start your day with the Uffizi Gallery (Priority Entrance Tour), lunch at Panini Toscani and explore the historical centre to finish your walk in Piazza del Duomo.
  • Florence stay – Day 2: Another day fully dedicated to this beautiful city with Piazza Duomo (Dome via the Priority Entrance), Ponte Vecchio, a walk through Oltrarno and back to the historical centre. You may also want to check out the Forte di Belvedere (free entrance), a 15th-century fortress with a panoramic view of Florence and regular art exhibitions.
  • Lucca stay – Day 3: Rent the car and begin your drive through the beautiful Tuscany, starting from the unique Lucca. However, after two days of walking around Florence, you definitely deserve a day at the Thermal Baths in the lovely Montecatini Terme town, halfway to Lucca. Montecatini is so beautiful that has been listed in the UNESCO “Great Spa Towns of Europe“. You can easily spend the entire day not only visiting the town but also enjoying the famous Thermal SPA built in the 8th century. In the late afternoon, finish the drive to Lucca, where you will spend the next 3 nights.
  • Lucca stay – Day 4: Have a drive in the morning to Pisa to visit the iconic Leaning Tower (skip-the-line ticket is a must) and of course the Cathedral. After lunch, you can go back to Lucca and explore the town there starting from the Piazza Napoleone, where you can see the 15th-century Ducal Palace. Keep going either on the unique pedestrian wall all around the town or visit one of the several towers.
  • Lucca stay – Day 5: Time to visit the unassuming north of Tuscany on a nice loop with the first stop in Bagni di Lucca. The Italian word “Bagni” means Baths, Thermal Baths. This town is a great spot for a morning of thermal treatment in a SPA that dates back to the Roman Empire. Are you more of an action person? Check out the adrenaline-oriented Canyon Park. Either way, you should add to your list also a walk over the Chains Bridge, one of the oldest iron bridges in the world. In the afternoon keep driving north to visit the Ariostesca Fortress in Castelnuovo di Carfagnana. If you have still time, take the road SP13 to Carrara, to visit the town world famous for its Marble. You may be also able to visit a cave if not too late on your trip. From there back to Lucca through the quick highway (around 1 hour). On a hot day you can also think to stop for a swim in the posh Forte Dei Marmi.
  • Chianti Area stay – Day 6: This is the day for the beautiful Chianti Area. Drive to Greve in Chianti, the most iconic town in the Chianti Region. However, on the way you may want to have a quick stop in San Miniato, one of the most famous places in the world for its white truffle, which you can taste in a few shops in the centre of the village (it’s not going to be cheap however). Once arrived at Greve, start your wandering from Piazza Matteotti and the historical centreVisit a wine shop and taste some wine while strolling through the streets. You can try more wine at lunch at the restaurant Il Vinaio. After lunch, visit Azienda Agricola Manetti Leonardo winery, a few hundred meters from the centre. In addition to tasting more wine, you will learn about the local area. You may then decide to visit the Wine Museum or the Castello di Uzzano, where you can have a walk among the wineries.
  • Siena stay – Day 7: Organise your luggage for the next destination and make your way through the Chianti Area, one of the prettiest places on earth. A visit to Montefioralle, a picturesque medieval settlement surrounded by walls, is an excellent start to the tour. Amazingly beautiful. Drive south on the SR222 (the Chianti Road towards Siena) and visit the Castello di Panzano in Chianti and Panzano for lunch. Continue along the SR222 to another charming medieval village, Castellina in Chianti. Take a tour of the Chianti Area Archaeological Museum and enjoy some wine tasting. Travel towards Siena, where you will book your hotel for the last four nights (ask the hotel about parking)
  • Siena stay – Day 8: Take a morning tour of Siena. Visit the Piazza del Campo, the Public Palace, and the Duomo Cathedral (skip-the-line tickets are highly recommended). Depending on how much time you have left, you may also want to pay a visit to the nearby Baptistery of St. John. Afterwards, you can drive to San Gimignano, a beautiful medieval village famous for its towers and of course the white wine, unique in this land of reds. Dining in Siena at the Osteria Permalico, an enchanting wine cellar restaurant
  • Siena stay – Day 9: Time to discover the Val D’Orcia. One of these panoramic viewpoints (SP18 Viewpoint, Cipressi di San Quirico and Cipressi di Monticchiello) is an excellent place from which to observe Tuscany at its best. These sights are located close to Gladiator Point, where the legendary Gladiator is filmed among cypress trees in the movie. It’s a beautiful part of the world. For lunch, stop at Podere Il Casale. Besides the delicious local food, the views are just stunning. Explore the beautiful medieval town of Montepulciano, known for making one of the world’s most renowned wines, the Nobile di Montepulciano. Stroll through the streets and enjoy some tasting at one of the many wine shops. The Vecchia Cantina di Montepulciano is also worth visiting, as you can taste yet more wine with the local winemaker and buy a few bottles at a great price.
  • Siena stay – Day 10: In the morning, more exploration of Siena. Tigella Emilia‘s great pasta for lunch. Drive to Montalcino in the afternoon, another stunning medieval town and home of the Brunello di Montalcino wine. In the Historic Center, you will see a few wine shops where you can sample the local wines. Have you got some spare time? Take a short trip to the Azienda Tornesi (book an appointment in advance) just outside the town for more tasting with the winemaker.

If you’d rather stay in the countryside, you can book your accommodation in Val D’Orcia and drive to Siena on a day or half-day trip.

The majority of Siena’s hotels offer parking or will tell you where to park (public or private). Do not venture with the car into the historic centre. You should read my guide to effortless parking in Siena to avoid spending a fortune when living your car.

Accommodations and experiences:

Tuscany by car on the go

10 days in Tuscany with a car on the go
10 days in Tuscany with a car on the go

Start your trip with two days in Florence, where you will not need a car

  • Florence stay – Day 1: Similar to the previous plans, start your day with the Uffizi Gallery (Priority Entrance Tour), lunch at Panini Toscani and explore the historical centre to finish your walk in Piazza del Duomo.
  • Florence stay – Day 2: Another day fully dedicated to this beautiful city with Piazza Duomo (Dome via the Priority Entrance), Ponte Vecchio, a walk through Oltrarno and back to the historical centre. You may also want to check out the Forte di Belvedere (free entrance), a 15th-century fortress with a panoramic view of Florence and regular art exhibitions.
  • Lucca stay – Day 3: Rent the car in Florence and begin your drive through the beautiful Tuscany starting from the unique Lucca. However, take the long way through the Carfagnana Valley, in the unassuming north of Tuscany with the first stop in Bagni di Lucca. The Italian “Bagni” is the word for baths and more specifically thermal baths. This is the perfect place to start the day with a morning of thermal treatment in an ancient SPA dating back to the Roman Empire. Are you more action-oriented? Visit Canyon Park for an adrenaline rush. In any case, once in Bagni di Lucca, you should include a walk over the Chains Bridge, one of the world’s oldest iron bridges. Then, drive north to Castelnuovo di Carfagnana and visit the Ariostesca Fortress. From there, visit Carrara (road SP13 direction west), the world-famous town for its marble, if you’ve still got time. Depending on how late you are on your trip, you might be able to visit a marble cave as well. From there, it’s only a short drive back to Lucca (around one hour). In the hot summer months, you may also want to consider taking a swim in the fancy Forte Dei Marmi.
  • Lucca stay – Day 4: Spend the morning visiting Pisa and the Leaning Tower (skip-the-line ticket is a must), as well as the Cathedral. Then, after lunch, head back to Lucca where you can take in the beautiful Ducal Palace in Piazza Napoleone which dates back to the 15th century. Visit one of the famous towers or the unique pedestrian wall that winds its way around the city.
  • Chianti Area stay – Day 5: another day, another place. Pack your luggage and in the morning drive to the lovely San Gimignano (1h30m), a beautiful medieval village known for its multiple towers and as the centre of the Tuscan white wines (Vernaccia di San Gimignano) since the 12th century. Try some wine tasting in one of the many wine shops in the historical center. A visit to the winery Tenuta Le Calcinaie (call for an appointment) is an option as well. For a quick lunch go to RiccaPizza or, with more time, head to Le Vecchie Mura restaurant for an amazing view of San Gimignano Valley besides the great local food. Next stop is Montefioralle, another charming hilltop village perfect for getting lost. Check into your hotel in the Chianti Area and enjoy a quiet evening before dinner.
  • Siena stay – Day 6: Prepare your bags for the next destination. This is the day dedicated to enjoying the picturesque views along the SR222, the Chianti Road. Along the way, you will find a few great stops. A good starting point for exploring the region is the town of Greve in Chianti. Take a stroll through Piazza Matteotti and the historic centre. A few hundred meters away from the main square is the Azienda Agricola Manetti Leonardo winery, where you might enjoy some wine tasting. Lunch in the town of Panzano where you can also visit the Castello di Panzano in Chianti. Continue along the SR222 to another charming medieval village, Castellina in Chianti. Take a tour of the Chianti Area Archaeological Museum and enjoy some wine tasting. Continue toward Siena, where you will stay for the night. (Ask your hotel regarding parking)
  • Siena stay – Day 7: Visit Siena in the morning. Explore the Piazza del Campo, the Public Palace, and the Duomo Cathedral (skip-the-line tickets are highly recommended). Check out the nearby Baptistery of St. John if you still have time. The pasta at Tigella Emilia is excellent for lunch. In the afternoon, visit Montalcino, another fascinating medieval town and home to the Brunello di Montalcino wine. Several wine shops can be found in the Historic Centre, where you can sample local wines. Any spare time in your schedule? To learn more about the wines, visit Azienda Tornesi (book an appointment with the winemaker before you go) just outside the town.
  • Val D’Orcia stay – Day 8: pack your bags and drive south of Tuscany, to one of the most picturesque parts of this region, the Val D’Orcia, where you will spend your next 2 nights. Drive first to one of these panoramic viewpoints (SP18 Viewpoint, Cipressi di San Quirico and Cipressi di Monticchiello). The three viewing spots are located close to a well-known movie location, Gladiator Point, where Maximus Decimus Meridius, the main character in the movie Gladiator, is famously pictured between cypress trees. Beautiful countryside. Lunch at Podere Il Casale is a great way to break up a day of touring the Val D’Orcia. In addition to the unique beautiful views of the rolling hills, the local cuisine is outstanding. Visit the charming village of Montepulciano, which produces one of the world’s most famous wines, the Nobile di Montepulciano. Take in the sights and sounds of the streets, where there are plenty of wine shops for some wine tasting of course. Check out the Vecchia Cantina di Montepulciano while you’re still in Montepulciano. Taste more wine with the winemaker and talk about the soil and the wine-making process before buying a few bottles.
  • Val D’Orcia stay – Day 9: it has been an intense 8 days, you have been visiting a lot of Tuscany. There is one missing thing, however, a relaxing one I may add. This day is dedicated to the thermal baths. There are a few SPA areas in the south of Tuscany, some of them are public (no entrance fee, basically a small hot river in a lovely natural setup). These are the Terme di Petriolo, Bagni di San Filippo and the amazing Cascate del Mulino in Saturnia. For a more fancy experience (entrance fee applies), you should instead check out San Casciano dei Bagni or Chianciano Terme.
  • Arezzo stay – Day 10: Get ready for Arezzo, the last stop in this Tuscan journey. You should first drive to Cortona (1 hour), one of the most beautiful medieval towns in Tuscany, the setting of the 2003 movie “Under the Tuscan Sun”. There’s no doubt that it’s a popular village, it can be crowded during the day, but it’s still worth the trip. Afterwards, drive to Arezzo for your last night in Tuscany. Must-see in Arezzo are the Piazza Grande, Santa Maria della Pieve and the Arezzo Cathedral.

Accommodations and experiences:

Beautiful rolling hills of Tuscany
Beautiful rolling hills of Tuscany

Tuscany countryside by car

It is hard for me to suggest only a few places to visit in the countryside due to the astonishing number of amazing locations.

In this guide, I have already suggested a number of things to do in both the Chianti Area and Val D’Orcia.

Here are a few public thermal baths, some of them with free entry (mostly rivers or small streams), that you might want to add to your must-see list:

  • Bagni di Lucca
  • Montecatini Terme
  • Acqua delle Terme di Sorano
  • Bagno Grande di San Casciano
  • Terme San Filippo
  • Chianciano Terme
  • Terme di Petrolio
  • Cascate del Mulino in Saturnia

I also share here the Google Map that I made public with all my saved places which I update regularly as I find new spots.

Map of the attractions in the Tuscan countryside
Map of the attractions in the Tuscan countryside – Check the Interactive Google Map

I leave it to you to draw the lines between these dots to build your own personal itinerary.

What cities should I visit in Tuscany in 10 days?

Florence, Pisa, Siena, and the Chianti region are must-visits.

Is 10 days enough to explore Tuscany?

Yes, 10 days provide a good amount of time to explore Tuscany’s main attractions. Rent a car to visit medieval villages and natural spas.

What are the top attractions in Tuscany?

Uffizi Gallery, Piazza Duomo, Ponte Vecchio, and Leaning Tower of Pisa are top attractions. Also, the Historic Centre of Siena is spectacular as well as the one of Cortona

Where should I stay in Tuscany?

Florence and Siena are great bases for exploring Tuscany by public transportation. The countryside and small towns work better if you have rented a car, less expensive and more picturesque

Is it recommended to rent a car in Tuscany?

I personally highly suggest hiring a car in Tuscany. There are so many reasons I list in this article.

Can I visit wineries in Tuscany?

Yes, visiting wineries in the Chianti region is a highlight of Tuscany. You can easily do that with an organised tour. I also highly suggest visiting the wineries of Val D’Orcia (you may need a car for that)

What’s unique about Siena?

Siena is known for its medieval cityscape, Piazza del Campo, and Duomo di Siena.

Tuscany rolling hills
Tuscany rolling hills
A corner of Tuscany
A corner of Tuscany
Ponte Vecchio at sunset
Florence Ponte Vecchio at sunset
Life in the lanes of Florence
Florence, the city of art
Florence, the city of art
The leaning Tower of Pisa
The Leaning Tower of Pisa
Lucca main square
Lucca main square
Arezzo dressed up square
Arezzo dressed up square
View of beautiful Siena
View of beautiful Siena
Siena - Palazzo Pubblico & Torre del Mangia
Siena – Palazzo Pubblico & Torre del Mangia
Stefano Ferro - MEL365.com Founder and Editor

About the Author

Stefano is a seasoned travel expert and the visionary founder of MEL365.com, a leading travel website with traffic across 6 continents. With a rich background in the travel industry, Stefano spent four pivotal years at Amadeus Travel Distribution System, gaining invaluable insights into travel technologies and distribution.

1 thought on “10 days in Tuscany without a car and by car [best 5 itineraries with maps]”

  1. If you could stay in Tuscany for a month – where would you choose as your home base? I studied abroad in Florence (loved every minute!) so I want to focus more on the countryside this time around (Chianti/Val d’Orcia areas). Can you rent a car in the smaller towns or would you recommend renting the car out of Florence? Thanks for all of your tips and suggestions!

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