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Kathmandu before and after the Earthquake, Nepal

Kathmandu before and after the Earthquake, Nepal

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The Nepal earthquake is still in our news. It has been one of the most catastrophic event ever and we still do not know the real size and consequences of it because many villages and town up in the mountains are still inaccessible. I was never in Nepal and I am sure that it will never be as before. It will take a long time for the local population to go back to the daily life. My grandma used to tell me stories of a similar earthquake she experienced in Europe even after 20 years, still in her brain like it happened a week before.

How was Kathmandu before the earthquake? The AirPano project just posted a new 360 degrees view of the city before the tragic event

It is quite amazing I must say. AirPano never stops to surprise me but this time there is something more. It is a documentation of a place that will never be the same.

How is after the earthquake? There is a project called Nepal Photo Project in Instagram which documents the people and city strugle to go back to the usual life.

Good luck to the Nepalese people they really need and deserve it

As well as the devastating loss of human life from the earthquake, Nepalis have lost parts of the country's unique cultural heritage. The temples and other shrines that have been reduced to dust are not just monuments or museuns – they’re living and vital centers for religious, cultural and social activities. They are tended to by priests, visited by devotees, and packed during festivals – linked with a vibrant and intangible heritage shared by people here. Much of the Kathmandu Valley is a UNESCO World Heritage Site – but although made from brick and mortar (as many as 4000 years ago in some cases) these temples are manifestations of gods and goddesses. Many believe it’s next to impossible to recover the splendor. Besides the effect that has on those living here, people are worried that along with this destruction will come a massive reduction in the number of tourists to the area. And tourism is big and vital business here…Photo by @samreinders #nepal #nepalearthquake #nepalphotoproject #kathmandu #journal #bhaktapur #durbarsquare #heritage #UNESCO #rebuild

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Kirtipur III Di-khyah in the Kirtipur Muncipality, which is situated in the Bagmati Zone of Kathmandu District. Kirtipur's history dates from 1099 AD. It was part of the territory of Lalitpur at the time of the invasion of the Kathmandu Valley by the Gorkhali king Prithvi Narayan Shah in the 18th cetury Found in the 11th Century, Kirtipur is still a centre of Newari Culture. The photo shows a house, which is no more advised to be lived in due to the deformation caused to it after the 7.8 magnitude earthquake that struck Nepal on April 25, 2015. According to the statistics obtained from the local municipal office, as many an 227 (recently updated) houses were devastated and 900 families were displaced. I am in Nepal working with Hope and Humanity, an NGO based in New Delhi. Our first day of survey ended with saddening thoughts and determined hearts. Hope and Humanity with All Manipur Gorkha Student's Union and The Hornbill Express is fundraising and arranging for other material to provide relief to the affected. Photo by @ujwalgarg0412 #Kirtipur #Kathmandu #Nepal #NepalEarthquake #NepalPhotoProject #HopeAndHumanity #TheHornbillExpress #AMGSU

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Kirtipur II One the first houses to collapse in Di-khyah when the 7.8 magnitude earthquake hit Nepal on April 25, 2015. Di-khyah is in the Kirtipur Muncipality which is situated in the Bagmati Zone of Kathmandu District. Kirtipur's history dates from 1099 AD. It was part of the territory of Lalitpur at the time of the invasion of the Kathmandu Valley by the Gorkhali king Prithvi Narayan Shah. Found in the 11th Century, Kirtipur is still a centre of Newari Culture. According to the statistics obtained from the local municipality, as many an 211 houses were devastated and 900 families were displaced as a result of the two major earthquakes and a series of tremors from April 25, 2015. I am in Nepal as a volunteer with Hope and Humanity, an NGO based in New Delhi. Hope and Humanity is working with All Manipur Gorkha Student's Union and The Hornbill Express in New Delhi for fundraising and arranging other material to provide relief to the affected. Photo by @ujwalgarg0412 #Kirtipur #Kathmandu #Nepal #NepalEarthquake #NepalPhotoProject #HopeAndHumanity #TheHornbillExpress #AMGSU

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Kirtipur I A local vendor sells edibles on the forefront on the Kirtipur Municipality which is situated in the Bagmati Zone of Kathmandu District. Found in the 11th Century, Kirtipur is still a centre of Newari Culture. According to the statistics obtained from the local municipality, as many an 211 houses were devastated and 900 families were displaced as a result of the two major earthquakes and a series of tremors from April 25, 2015. I am in Nepal as a volunteer with Hope and Humanity, an NGO based in New Delhi. Hope and Humanity is working with All Manipur Gorkha Student's Union and The Hornbill Express in New Delhi for fundraising and arranging other material to provide relief to the affected. Photo by @ujwalgarg0412 #Kirtipur #Kathmandu #Nepal #NepalEarthquake #NepalPhotoProject #HopeAndHumanity #TheHornbillExpress #AMGSU

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Funerals in Nepal are a multi-sensory experience. It doesn’t matter where you live in the world, what your religion is or what your cultural practices are that dictate the rituals for this occasion – they are always devastating…they are a final goodbye. The most final of final. I spent the afternoon yesterday in Nayabazar with my camera. I heard the cymbals first, then the smell of incense, and then the wailing. Gut-wrenching wailing, of the procession of women (mother, wife, sisters of the deceased) that preceded the marigold covered body of a deceased man who had succumbed to injuries sustained from the earthquake. It’s a sound you can’t unhear… The procession moved slowly passed me. I kept to the back of a large group of mourners. A series of rituals were followed out before the body was set on fire – and his soul freed to start its next adventure. At 5.19pm, minutes after the fire was started, another severe aftershock shook the city. Mourners scattered for a nearby road that was open and clear of tall buildings -fear replacing the tears. Photo by @samreinders #nepal #nepalearthquake #nepalphotoproject #kathmandu #journal #funeral #ritual

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Sankhu is one of the areas worst affected by the earthquake in the Kathmandu valley. Though relief and donations have been pouring in, locals complain that none has been focused to sustainable rehabilitation. After the May 12 second quake, many of the cracked houses have fallen down and most of the people are living outdoors. There are areas where the houses of an entire community have turned into rubble, resulting in a number of deaths. Locals avoid going to these areas as much as possible, which remind them of the ill-fated day. A walk down these alleys is bound to send a chill down your spine. Locals have slowly started clearing the rubble undertaking huge risks. Photo by @aerawbic #nepal #nepalphotoproject #nepalearthquake #sankhu #aftermath #work

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Stefano Ferro
Stefano is a cycling, movie and life style photographer with a big love for landscape & travel photography. When in Melbourne, his hometown, you will see him cycling around at sunset or sunrise looking for the best spot for a photo of this beautiful city. It is quite amazing how much photography gear he can pack on his bike :o

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Stefano Ferro
Stefano is a cycling, movie and life style photographer with a big love for landscape & travel photography. When in Melbourne, his hometown, you will see him cycling around at sunset or sunrise looking for the best spot for a photo of this beautiful city. It is quite amazing how much photography gear he can pack on his bike :o