The jummah mosque in mauritius
 

Jummah Mosque in Mauritius – A must visit place in Port Louis

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

The Jummah Mosque in Mauritius was one of my highlight in Port Louis. I had the possibility to visit most of the accessible rooms including the rooftop which was quite spectacular. The building of the mosque  started in the 1850s, with substantial additions built through the 1890s.

Jummah Mosque in Mauritius – history from 1852

One of the elderlies of the mosque approached me when I was inside and he guided me through the building explaining the history behind it.

The need of a principal mosque in Port-Louis was deeply felt and hence in October 1852 some Muslim merchants purchased some plots of land in the City Centre where they hold their businesses and immediately arrangements were made to start performing daily prayers. One of the building was repaired, and converted into a House of Prayer, pending the construction of the Mosque

The jummah mosque in mauritius

A guided tour at the Jummah mosque in Mauritius

Mauritius_20150821_609_Jummah Masjid_ Mauritius_ Mosque_ Port Louis

The inside of the Jummah mosque in Mauritius

Mauritius_20150821_585_Jummah Masjid_ Mauritius_ Mosque_ Port Louis

The need of a second Mosque was felt in Port-Louis as the small mosque in the Eastern Suburb, then known as Malabar Town, could not accommodate more than one hundred people and was about a few kilometres away from the centre of the town.

By 1853, a small mosque known under the name of “Mosquee des Arabes” erected on the new site was solemnly consecrated. That small mosque was the original Juma’ Mosque and it symbolised the faith, zeal and selflessness of those early pioneers of Islam.

As years rolled by and the Muslim Community increased, the small mosque which could accommodate 200 persons only became inadequate to its large congregation. The necessity of a larger building was keenly felt, but space could not be made available until 1859.

The Jummah Mosque grows

From 1859 to 1877 seven adjoining properties were purchased by a few Muslim merchants and handed over to the Directors of the Mosque.

Thanks to the generosity and devotion of those Muslim Merchants, the whole Mohamedan Congregation of the Juma’ Mosque became the owner of the quadrangle measuring a little over three quarters of an acre on which the Juma’ Mosque now stands.

The place of worship was not built wholly at the same time, but is composed of the original Mosque extended and embellished when the adjoining properties were purchased. The expansion work which was necessary to transform the “Mosquee des Arabes” into the present Juma’ Mosque entailed considerable expenses. A rate of 02 cents of a rupee was levied upon every bag of grain sold by the grain merchants to the general trade indistinctly. For many years all dealers in grain paid the rate ‘for the church‘ as it was called

Mauritius_20150821_589_Jummah Masjid_ Mauritius_ Mosque_ Port Louis

Mauritius_20150821_584_Jummah Masjid_ Mauritius_ Mosque_ Port Louis

From the year 1878 skilled Indian artisans worked daily at the new edifice, living within its precincts. The local workmen of that time had not the skill and dexterity of Indian workmen for that special kind of work. So skilled hands had to be employed for the plastering, the moulding of the sculpture work, the finishing and the ornamentation.

At that time Indian labour could be transported here very cheaply as the members sitting on the Board of the Mosque were themselves owners of ships plying between India and Mauritius. The work was often interrupted by outbreaks of disease, shortage of hands or materials, but, eventually in 1895, the aggrandizement was completed.

The main door to the Jummah mosque in Mauritius

The main door to the Jummah mosque in Mauritius

Accomodation

One thing you can easily find in Mauritius is an organised resort. At first I was looking into it as an option and I found that Hotels Combined offered the best packages. In saying that, at the end I decided to go for 2 bed and breakfast because they both gave me more freedom with my timing and my photography. I did not really want to be stressed when out on a sunset (usually at the same time of dinner).

I decided to spend the first week on the south-west coast. From there I could see the southern part of the island, the Black River Gorges National Park, Grand Bassin and the capital of Mauritius, Port Louis.

After some investigation I decided to book Marlin Creek in Riviere Noire. Cristophe and Ingrid, the owners, were just two stars on earth. Super friendly and always providing advices on things to do and discover. It is in the middle of the Riviere Noir village where I could find few restaurants for the night. Freshly cooked breakfast was waiting in the morning, which was a great plus 😀

The room I had was spacious and really well cleaned. Difficult to find anything that did not work. Great experience

The second week I was up north where I believe you can find the best beaches of Mauritius. From there I could also visit the north route up to Grand Gaube and the Grand Baie area.

I booked at the Bleu De Toi Boutique Guest House in Pereybere. It was a real heaven. I stayed in the Hope room, in front of the garden and the swimming pool (I love my early morning swim) and it was just awesome. Great big breakfast too, anything you want just ask. I really liked the décor all around the guest house, I felt like in the perfect creole place. It’s not really located in the centre of Pereybere. You need a 10 minutes walk for either the public beach or the restaurants which was not a big deal to me anyway.

I personally suggest to book the accommodation in Mauritius in advance. Too hard to get around and on-line you get the best deals

Please note that I do not have any affiliations with both guest house owners, I just had a great stay

Travel and photography tips

  • A zoom lens will help to capture the details of this spectacular building. If you have a fix lens you may miss them.
  • Unfortunately my zoom lens has a maximum aperture of f/4 so I had to push the ISO value up to 1000 (no flash in the mosque). I did expect some noticeable noise however I was surprised by the end result (as you see in the photos above). I used a Nikon D600 for all these photos
  • If you are not that keen to use full manual mode, set your aperture and shutter speed and leave the Automatic ISO
  • Do not worry about WB, set it to Automatic as well, you may recover the photos easily in post production if necessary
  • The place is obviously very quiet and you may not be able to access it during praying time, especially on Fridays
  • Women will be provided with a full dress
  • Donations are welcome

More info about Mauritius


  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Related Post

Stefano Ferro
Stefano is a cycling, movie and life style photographer with a big love for landscape & travel photography. When in Melbourne, his hometown, you will see him cycling around at sunset or sunrise looking for the best spot for a photo of this beautiful city. It is quite amazing how much photography gear he can pack on his bike :o

Latest popular posts

 

Leave a Comment